THE KING AND I

India is the Kingdom where Mangoes rule the World of Fruits, undoubtedly the King of Fruits.

Mangoes are the compensation to this land for bearing the Hot Summer Months. The Scorching heat fills these scrumptious Fruits with the Sweetest of Juices. The Hotter the Summer the sweeter  are the Mangoes.

Mangoes ( English), Aam ( Hindi), Mangifera indica ( Scientific name)  are native to the Indian Subcontinent and entrenched in the the History of this Ancient Land. It is from this ancient Land that they spread to the rest of the World.

The Mango Tree is revered in India and forms part of all auspicious functions like Inaugrating a New Home or A Wedding.

Garlands are made from Mango leaves and hung on the Main Entrances of Homes symbolizing Fertility and Good Luck.

mango tree
The Tree of the King of Fruits

Spring covers the trees with blossoms , the fragrance of which drives the pollinators like Bees wild.

The famous design called Paisley ( Kairi in Hindi)  owes it shape to the King of Fruits , Mangoes. Have a look at the Mango on the Left  below and turn it 180 degrees clockwise. Behold the Paisley.

the blooms
The Blossoms and Raw Mangoes

Raw Mangoes form the base of numerous mouth watering Pickles and Chutney. Each region of this Land has a different species of Mangoes and thus  naturally hundreds of Recipes abound.

It would take a lifetime  to discover and taste all the recipes.

plenty of mangoes
Curvaceous Mangoes

For me personally Mangoes are my favourite Fruit and of the hundreds of species of mangoes, Chausa rules my Taste Buds.

Are you still reading the blog, go and grab a Mango. The King of Fruits will disappear within a month.

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Published by

mukul chand

51 year old entrepreneur who has traveled extensively around the world for work and pleasure , is based in New Delhi, India. A passionate traveler born with a love for flora and fauna, is an active naturalist and amateur photographer. Here he shares his unique insight into Incredible India revealing its mysterious and exotic treasures. Writing from his heart he shares his experiences as he crisscrosses this vast and amazing land.

76 thoughts on “THE KING AND I”

  1. Very , very true. Here the mango season is almost over. We do get in the markets but they are not that good. Here we have a variety of small wild mangoes, some are sweet like sugar others sour. We make rasam and other dishes with these wild mangoes.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I like Alphonsos too. Try the Chausa, you will love it too. There was a time many decades ago when I could tuck in quite a handful of the small ones. The arrival of Chausa signals the end of theMango Season. Thanks for checking in.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Growing up in high, windy, inland country, I barely knew what a mango was until 25 years ago. I had no idea about the connection between paisley design and mango fruits! I always learn something new on your blog, Mukal.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. thank you for sharing your experiences. I can relate to what you say, as I never knew what an artichoke was till about 25 years ago. Now the world is global, you can get any fruit or vegetable at anytime across the globe. Thanks for the compliments as well.

      Like

  3. We cannot grow mangoes in any part of California, but enjoy a few varieties that are imported from Mexico. In the US the apple substitutes for the mango, as it is growable in most of the states (not desert areas) and is available in hundreds of varieties. Personally, though, I prefer the taste of mangoes, though apples are much tidier to eat! Thanks for liking my blog post today.

    Liked by 1 person

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